Regional Volunteer Appreciation & Recognition

Celebrating Excellence and Commitment

Every year, the CPBI honours the commitment of its volunteers by awarding Regional Volunteer Awards. Both active and past council members are eligible for the award. 

Purpose of the Award

Recipients are individuals who have assisted the organization to achieve its mission and have provided exceptional support to their Region.


Nomination Criteria

  • Does the volunteer's work meet the following criteria, and if so, how?
  • How does this volunteer enable the organization to achieve its mission or purpose at the regional level?
  • What form of outstanding support has he/she provided – meeting facilitation, workshop leaders, trainer, and other support?
  • What other donations has he/she made to the organization? (e.g. speaking engagements, long-time membership)
  • Both active and past council members are eligible for the award (longtime membership and volunteerism) 

Nominating Procedure

  • The Regional Chair will put a call out to all members in the Region and encourage his Regional Council to submit nominations for the CPBI Regional Volunteer Appreciation Recognition. 
  • Nomination deadline is on April 1st of each year. 

Selection Process 

  • The Regional Chair in consultation with the Regional Council will select a nominee and notify the CPBI National Office. 

Know someone who deserves this award?
Download the nomination form here

See also

CPBI Ontario Winter Newsletter
March 21, 2017

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